Download and Read Online The Crooked Path To Abolition Abraham Lincoln And The Antislavery Constitution Book

Download The Crooked Path To Abolition Abraham Lincoln And The Antislavery Constitution Book PDF, Read Online The Crooked Path To Abolition Abraham Lincoln And The Antislavery Constitution Book Epub. Ebook The Crooked Path To Abolition Abraham Lincoln And The Antislavery Constitution Tuebl Download Online. The following is a list of various book titles based on search results using the keyword the crooked path to abolition abraham lincoln and the antislavery constitution. Click "GET BOOK" on the book you want. Register now and create a free account to access unlimited books, fast download, ad-free and books in good quality!

The Crooked Path to Abolition: Abraham Lincoln and the Antislavery Constitution

Author : James Oakes
Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
Release : 2021-01-12
Category : History
ISBN : 9781324005865

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book The Crooked Path to Abolition: Abraham Lincoln and the Antislavery Constitution Description/Summary:

An award-winning scholar uncovers the guiding principles of Lincoln’s antislavery strategies. The long and turning path to the abolition of American slavery has often been attributed to the equivocations and inconsistencies of antislavery leaders, including Lincoln himself. But James Oakes’s brilliant history of Lincoln’s antislavery strategies reveals a striking consistency and commitment extending over many years. The linchpin of antislavery for Lincoln was the Constitution of the United States. Lincoln adopted the antislavery view that the Constitution made freedom the rule in the United States, slavery the exception. Where federal power prevailed, so did freedom. Where state power prevailed, that state determined the status of slavery, and the federal government could not interfere. It would take state action to achieve the final abolition of American slavery. With this understanding, Lincoln and his antislavery allies used every tool available to undermine the institution. Wherever the Constitution empowered direct federal action—in the western territories, in the District of Columbia, over the slave trade—they intervened. As a congressman in 1849 Lincoln sponsored a bill to abolish slavery in Washington, DC. He reentered politics in 1854 to oppose what he considered the unconstitutional opening of the territories to slavery by the Kansas–Nebraska Act. He attempted to persuade states to abolish slavery by supporting gradual abolition with compensation for slaveholders and the colonization of free Blacks abroad. President Lincoln took full advantage of the antislavery options opened by the Civil War. Enslaved people who escaped to Union lines were declared free. The Emancipation Proclamation, a military order of the president, undermined slavery across the South. It led to abolition by six slave states, which then joined the coalition to affect what Lincoln called the "King’s cure": state ratification of the constitutional amendment that in 1865 finally abolished slavery.

The Crooked Path to Abolition

Author : James Oakes
Publisher : W. W. Norton
Release : 2022-01-11
Category : History
ISBN : 1324020199

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book The Crooked Path to Abolition Description/Summary:

An award-winning scholar uncovers the guiding principles of Lincoln's antislavery strategies.

The Crooked Path to Abolition

Author : James Oakes
Publisher : W. W. Norton
Release : 2021-01-12
Category : Uncategorized
ISBN : 1324005858

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book The Crooked Path to Abolition Description/Summary:

An award-winning scholar uncovers the guiding principles of Lincoln's antislavery strategies.

Lincoln and the Constitution

Author : Brian R. Dirck
Publisher : SIU Press
Release : 2012-05-12
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN : 9780809331185

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book Lincoln and the Constitution Description/Summary:

In this highly readable study of Abraham Lincoln’s thoughts and actions concerning the U.S. Constitution, Brian R. Dirck combines extensive primary research and thoughtful, accessible consideration of Lincoln’s views to reveal new insights into Lincoln’s impact on the U.S. Constitution. In the statesman’s roles as a leading antebellum politician, an ardent critic of slavery, and the president of the United States during the Civil War, Lincoln fashioned a strong antislavery constitutional ideology and articulated a constitutional vision of the Civil War that reinforced his determination to restore the Union. Grounding Lincoln’s constitutionalism in his reading habits and early legal career, Dirck masterfully balances biographical details, Lincoln’s value system, the opinions of his supporters and critics, and key events and ideas to show how his thinking about the U.S. Constitution changed over time. From Lincoln’s deep reverence for the work of the Founding Fathers to his innovative interpretation of presidential war powers, Dirck reveals Lincoln’s understanding of the Constitution to be progressive, emphasizing federal power as a tool to develop the economy, and pragmatic, in that he was often forced to make decisions on the fly during a remarkably volatile period in American history. Lincoln used his conception of presidential war powers to advance the twin causes of Union and emancipation, and Dirck explores the constitutional problems stirred by curbs Lincoln placed on civil liberties, internal security, and freedom of expression during wartime. More than a straightforward overview of Lincoln’s constitutional views, Lincoln and the Constitution provides a starting point for further inquiry into interpretations and defenses as well as the political, intellectual, and cultural traditions of the founding document of the United States. In the end, Dirck shows, Lincoln viewed the political and legal traditions of the Constitution with optimism, emphasizing throughout his life the possibilities he believed the document held—always keeping faith in it and swearing to protect it, even as he was awash in a sea of blood and controversy. Univeristy Press Books for Public and Secondary Schools 2013 edition

Constitutionalism in the Approach and Aftermath of the Civil War

Author : Paul D. Moreno,Jonathan O'Neill
Publisher : Fordham Univ Press
Release : 2013-07
Category : History
ISBN : 9780823251940

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book Constitutionalism in the Approach and Aftermath of the Civil War Description/Summary:

Nine essays which examine constitutional issues at different points in American political history to explain how the constitutional issues resulting in the Civil War were central to politics for a long time before and after the actual conflict. Treats the period from the 1780s through the 1920s.

The Scorpion's Sting: Antislavery and the Coming of the Civil War

Author : James Oakes
Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
Release : 2014-05-19
Category : History
ISBN : 9780393239935

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book The Scorpion's Sting: Antislavery and the Coming of the Civil War Description/Summary:

Explores the Civil War and the anti-slavery movement, specifically highlighting the plan to help abolish slavery by surrounding the slave states with territories of freedom and discusses the possibility of what could've been a more peaceful alternative to the war. 17,000 first printing.

The Battles that Made Abraham Lincoln

Author : Larry Tagg
Publisher : Grub Street Publishers
Release : 2012-12-19
Category : History
ISBN : 9781611211276

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book The Battles that Made Abraham Lincoln Description/Summary:

A timely look at the atmosphere of political hostility surrounding the Civil War, and the venom faced by America’s sixteenth president. Today, Abraham Lincoln is a beloved American icon, widely considered to be our best president. It was not always so. This book takes a look at what Lincoln’s contemporaries actually thought and said about him during his lifetime, when political hostilities, and ultimately civil war, raged. The era in which our sixteenth president lived and governed was the most rough-and-tumble in the history of American politics. The hostility behind the criticism aimed at Lincoln by the great men of his time, on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line, is startling, the spectacular prejudice against him often shocking for its cruelty, intensity, and unrelenting vigor. The plain truth is that Lincoln was deeply reviled by many in his time. This book is both an entertaining read and a well-researched, serious look at the political context that begat the president’s predicament. Lincoln’s humanity has been unintentionally trivialized by some historians and writers who have hidden away the real man in a patina of bronze. This book helps us better understand the man he was, and how history is better and more clearly viewed through a long-distance lens. “Not the warm and fuzzy portrait we’re used to seeing . . . An eye-opening study, the first of its kind to focus on what Lincoln’s contemporaries really thought of him. On the other hand, this is not mean-spirited Lincoln-bashing . . . Tagg assesses his presidency through the social and political context of mid-19th century America. It was a time, for example, when ‘the rabid press routinely destroyed the reputations of public men,’ when the stature of the presidency, ‘stained by feeble performances from a string of the poorest presidents in the nation’s history,’ had plunged over decades.” —Civil War Times Magazine

The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics

Author : James Oakes
Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
Release : 2011-02-07
Category : History
ISBN : 9780393078725

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics Description/Summary:

"A great American tale told with a deft historical eye, painstaking analysis, and a supple clarity of writing.”—Jean Baker “My husband considered you a dear friend,” Mary Todd Lincoln wrote to Frederick Douglass in the weeks after Lincoln’s assassination. The frontier lawyer and the former slave, the cautious politician and the fiery reformer, the President and the most famous black man in America—their lives traced different paths that finally met in the bloody landscape of secession, Civil War, and emancipation. Opponents at first, they gradually became allies, each influenced by and attracted to the other. Their three meetings in the White House signaled a profound shift in the direction of the Civil War, and in the fate of the United States. James Oakes has written a masterful narrative history, bringing two iconic figures to life and shedding new light on the central issues of slavery, race, and equality in Civil War America.

Big Enough to Be Inconsistent

Author : George M Fredrickson
Publisher : Harvard University Press
Release : 2009-06-30
Category : History
ISBN : 9780674033733

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book Big Enough to Be Inconsistent Description/Summary:

This book focuses on the most controversial aspect of Lincoln's thought and politics - his attitudes and actions regarding slavery and race. Drawing attention to the limitations of Lincoln's judgment and policies without denying his magnitude, the book provides the most comprehensive and even-handed account available of Lincoln's contradictory treatment of black Americans in matters of slavery in the South and basic civil rights in the North.

Act of Justice

Author : Burrus Carnahan
Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
Release : 2007-09-21
Category : History
ISBN : 9780813172736

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book Act of Justice Description/Summary:

In his first inaugural address, Abraham Lincoln declared that as president he would “have no lawful right” to interfere with the institution of slavery. Yet less than two years later, he issued a proclamation intended to free all slaves throughout the Confederate states. When critics challenged the constitutional soundness of the act, Lincoln pointed to the international laws and usages of war as the legal basis for his Proclamation, asserting that the Constitution invested the president “with the law of war in time of war.” As the Civil War intensified, the Lincoln administration slowly and reluctantly accorded full belligerent rights to the Confederacy under the law of war. This included designating a prisoner of war status for captives, honoring flags of truce, and negotiating formal agreements for the exchange of prisoners—practices that laid the intellectual foundations for emancipation. Once the United States allowed Confederates all the privileges of belligerents under international law, it followed that they should also suffer the disadvantages, including trial by military courts, seizure of property, and eventually the emancipation of slaves. Even after the Lincoln administration decided to apply the law of war, it was unclear whether state and federal courts would agree. After careful analysis, author Burrus M. Carnahan concludes that if the courts had decided that the proclamation was not justified, the result would have been the personal legal liability of thousands of Union officers to aggrieved slave owners. This argument offers further support to the notion that Lincoln’s delay in issuing the Emancipation Proclamation was an exercise of political prudence, not a personal reluctance to free the slaves. In Act of Justice, Carnahan contends that Lincoln was no reluctant emancipator; he wrote a truly radical document that treated Confederate slaves as an oppressed people rather than merely as enemy property. In this respect, Lincoln’s proclamation anticipated the psychological warfare tactics of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Carnahan’s exploration of the president’s war powers illuminates the origins of early debates about war powers and the Constitution and their link to international law.

No Property in Man

Author : Sean Wilentz
Publisher : Harvard University Press
Release : 2019-09-03
Category : History
ISBN : 9780674244108

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book No Property in Man Description/Summary:

Driving straight to the heart of the most contentious issue in American history, Sean Wilentz argues controversially that, far from concealing a crime against humanity, the U.S. Constitution limited slavery’s legitimacy—a limitation which in time inspired the antislavery politics that led to Southern secession, the Civil War, and Emancipation.

Lincoln and the Politics of Slavery

Author : Daniel W. Crofts
Publisher : UNC Press Books
Release : 2016-02-13
Category : History
ISBN : 9781469627328

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book Lincoln and the Politics of Slavery Description/Summary:

In this landmark book, Daniel Crofts examines a little-known episode in the most celebrated aspect of Abraham Lincoln's life: his role as the "Great Emancipator." Lincoln always hated slavery, but he also believed it to be legal where it already existed, and he never imagined fighting a war to end it. In 1861, as part of a last-ditch effort to preserve the Union and prevent war, the new president even offered to accept a constitutional amendment that barred Congress from interfering with slavery in the slave states. Lincoln made this key overture in his first inaugural address. Crofts unearths the hidden history and political maneuvering behind the stillborn attempt to enact this amendment, the polar opposite of the actual Thirteenth Amendment of 1865 that ended slavery. This compelling book sheds light on an overlooked element of Lincoln's statecraft and presents a relentlessly honest portrayal of America's most admired president. Crofts rejects the view advanced by some Lincoln scholars that the wartime momentum toward emancipation originated well before the first shots were fired. Lincoln did indeed become the "Great Emancipator," but he had no such intention when he first took office. Only amid the crucible of combat did the war to save the Union become a war for freedom.

Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States, 1861-1865

Author : James Oakes
Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
Release : 2013
Category : History
ISBN : 9780393065312

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States, 1861-1865 Description/Summary:

Traces the history of emancipation and its impact on the Civil War, discussing how Lincoln and the Republicans fought primarily for freeing slaves throughout the war, not just as a secondary objective in an effort to restore the union. 30,000 first printing.

Every Drop of Blood

Author : Edward Achorn
Publisher : Atlantic Monthly Press
Release : 2020-03-03
Category : History
ISBN : 9780802148766

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book Every Drop of Blood Description/Summary:

A brilliantly conceived and vividly drawn story—Washington, D.C. on the eve of Abraham Lincoln’s historic second inaugural address as the lens through which to understand all the complexities of the Civil War By March 4, 1865, the Civil War had slaughtered more than 700,000 Americans and left intractable wounds on the nation. After a morning of rain-drenched fury, tens of thousands crowded Washington’s Capitol grounds that day to see Abraham Lincoln take the oath for a second term. As the sun emerged, Lincoln rose to give perhaps the greatest inaugural address in American history, stunning the nation by arguing, in a brief 701 words, that both sides had been wrong, and that the war’s unimaginable horrors—every drop of blood spilled—might well have been God’s just verdict on the national sin of slavery. Edward Achorn reveals the nation’s capital on that momentous day—with its mud, sewage, and saloons, its prostitutes, spies, reporters, social-climbing spouses and power-hungry politicians—as a microcosm of all the opposing forces that had driven the country apart. A host of characters, unknown and famous, had converged on Washington—from grievously wounded Union colonel Selden Connor in a Washington hospital and the embarrassingly drunk new vice president, Andrew Johnson, to poet-journalist Walt Whitman; from soldiers’ advocate Clara Barton and African American leader and Lincoln critic-turned-admirer Frederick Douglass (who called the speech “a sacred effort”) to conflicted actor John Wilkes Booth—all swirling around the complex figure of Lincoln. In indelible scenes, Achorn vividly captures the frenzy in the nation’s capital at this crucial moment in America’s history and the tension-filled hope and despair afflicting the country as a whole, soon to be heightened by Lincoln's assassination. His story offers new understanding of our great national crisis, and echoes down the decades to resonate in our own time.

The Black Man's President

Author : Michael Burlingame
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
Release : 2021-11-02
Category : History
ISBN : 9781643138145

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book The Black Man's President Description/Summary:

Frederick Douglass called the martyred president "emphatically the black man's president” as well as “the first who rose above the prejudice of his times and country.” This narrative history of Lincoln’s personal interchange with Black people over the course his career reveals a side of the sixteenth president that, until now, has not been fully explored or understood. In a little-noted eulogy delivered shortly after Lincoln's assassination, Frederick Douglass called the martyred president "emphatically the black man's president," the "first to show any respect for their rights as men.” To justify that description, Douglass pointed not just to Lincoln's official acts and utterances, like the Emancipation Proclamation or the Second Inaugural Address, but also to the president’s own personal experiences with Black people. Referring to one of his White House visits, Douglass said: "In daring to invite a Negro to an audience at the White House, Mr. Lincoln was saying to the country: I am President of the black people as well as the white, and I mean to respect their rights and feelings as men and as citizens.” But Lincoln’s description as “emphatically the black man’s president” rests on more than his relationship with Douglass or on his official words and deeds. Lincoln interacted with many other African Americans during his presidency His unfailing cordiality to them, his willingness to meet with them in the White House, to honor their requests, to invite them to consult on public policy, to treat them with respect whether they were kitchen servants or leaders of the Black community, to invite them to attend receptions, to sing and pray with them in their neighborhoods—all those manifestations of an egalitarian spirit fully justified the tributes paid to him by Frederick Douglass and other African Americans like Sojourner Truth, who said: "I never was treated by any one with more kindness and cordiality than were shown to me by that great and good man, Abraham Lincoln.” Historian David S. Reynolds observed recently that only by examining Lincoln’s “personal interchange with Black people do we see the complete falsity of the charges of innate racism that some have leveled against him over the years.”

Who Freed the Slaves?

Author : Leonard L. Richards
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
Release : 2015-04-06
Category : History
ISBN : 9780226208947

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book Who Freed the Slaves? Description/Summary:

In the popular imagination, slavery in the United States ended with Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. The Proclamation may have been limited—freeing only slaves within Confederate states who were able to make their way to Union lines—but it is nonetheless generally seen as the key moment, with Lincoln’s leadership setting into motion a train of inevitable events that culminated in the passage of an outright ban: the Thirteenth Amendment. The real story, however, is much more complicated—and dramatic—than that. With Who Freed the Slaves?, distinguished historian Leonard L. Richards tells the little-known story of the battle over the Thirteenth Amendment, and of James Ashley, the unsung Ohio congressman who proposed the amendment and steered it to passage. Taking readers to the floor of Congress and the back rooms where deals were made, Richards brings to life the messy process of legislation—a process made all the more complicated by the bloody war and the deep-rooted fear of black emancipation. We watch as Ashley proposes, fine-tunes, and pushes the amendment even as Lincoln drags his feet, only coming aboard and providing crucial support at the last minute. Even as emancipation became the law of the land, Richards shows, its opponents were already regrouping, beginning what would become a decades-long—and largely successful—fight to limit the amendment’s impact. Who Freed the Slaves? is a masterwork of American history, presenting a surprising, nuanced portrayal of a crucial moment for the nation, one whose effects are still being felt today.

Gateway to Freedom

Author : Eric Foner
Publisher : Unknown
Release : 2015-02-26
Category : Antislavery movements
ISBN : 9780198737902

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book Gateway to Freedom Description/Summary:

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner tells the story of how, between 1830 and 1860, three remarkable men from New York city - a journalist, a furniture polisher, and a black minister - led a secret network that helped no fewer than 3,000 fugitive slaves from the southern states of America to a new life of liberty in Canada.

Abe

Author : David S. Reynolds
Publisher : Penguin Press
Release : 2020
Category : Presidents
ISBN : 9781594206047

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book Abe Description/Summary:

"ABE is a cultural biography of Abraham Lincoln, following Lincoln's monumental life from cradle to grave while weaving a narrative that includes Lincoln's cultural influences and the nation-wide and regional cultural trends and moods and happenings of his day, and how Lincoln both shaped and was shaped by his America. The music, humor, literature, and fashions of the time and their impact on Lincoln's life are explored as well, and analysis of other important figures such as Lincoln's wife, his assassin, his professional partners, etc., also draw on this culturally focused style"--

The Life of David Hume

Author : Ernest Campbell Mossner
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release : 2001
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN : 0199243360

CLICK HERE TO GET BOOK

Book The Life of David Hume Description/Summary:

Mossner's Life of David Hume remains the standard biography of this great thinker and writer. First published in 1954, and updated in 1980, it is now reissued in paperback, in response to increased interest in Hume. E. C. Mossner was Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin. 'Mossner's work is a quite remarkable scholarly achievement; it will be an indispensable tool for Humescholars and a treasure-trove of information for all students of the intellectual and literary history of the eighteenth century' Richard H. Popkin in the Philological Quarterly 'This magnificentand exemplary work...has more than a biographical value. It is a study of intellectual reaction in the eighteenth century: a book for many readers, and not only for those of a philosophical turn.' C. E. Vulliamy in The Observer 'This is the work of a man thoroughly in love with his subject...this biography is the product of long and happy research. The length and the happiness both contribute to its merits.' The Times LiterarySupplement